Racism and Idealism

I have a theory: it’s possible that the white “racism” observed by non-white people is falsely rooted. I believe this “institutional racism” they perceive is in fact a misconception characterized by the failure to recognize the commonality among all peoples: struggle is a basic part of life. My assertion is that what blacks or brown people might perceive as white racism is merely a misdirected interpretation of the basic struggles of life or the “eternal struggle” as Hitler referred to it which leaves no group untainted. When times bring the black man down or when times bring down the brown man, there seems to be no shortage of people in media and education ready to indirectly convince them that white people play a crucial part in their problems. I think, in turn, many non-white people begin to attribute their novel problems to whiteness in some significant way. I say this because for most of my life, I did not think in terms of race or color, and yet during that time of my life, there was a very real animosity directed against me by non-whites.

In fact, as we go through our lives, we encounter difficult obstacles but often make the mistake of thinking that no one else is going through the same thing. The individual might be inclined to think that “nobody else could understand me,” or that “everybody else is happy, why does it seem like I’m the only one who isn’t?” Now, does it matter if someone else is dealing with the same problem that you’re going through? It does. It means that we individuals often have a common foe. What surprises me so much, despite living in the so-called “information age,” is how rarely we come together as a group to tackle common problems we individuals suffer from and how often we would rather deal with our problems on our own. As an example: many people struggle with social problems. Why haven’t people come together as a group and analyzed the social and sexual needs of all individuals within the population to create a system that serves to improve the social situation of at least most of the population, if not all its members?

This brings me to the media. By media, I mean all of its forms in our culture. The media is not just an agency with bias that serves to fulfill a political agenda, as some wiser people would believe, but in fact, it is a giant roadblock in the way of collective human progress. The media facilitates the role of a roadblock not necessarily by publishing a biased article, but instead by choosing not to say certain things, certain things that need to be said, certain things that need to be heard by the population in a given situation.

What is the best societal system and what is the best structure of power in which all people’s wants and needs are satisfied to mathematically maximum and optimum levels? To this question, I do not know the answer. From a hypothetical mathematical perspective, undoubtedly our nation leaves room for functional improvement in satisfying all areas: commerce, trade, culture, space exploration, wealth distribution, individual happiness, sexual satisfaction, individual and collective achievement and technological advancement. Looking back to history for answers such as looking at medieval times, we recognize the aristocrats, kings and nobles who ruled over the impoverished peasants in feudal authority. Surely, this feudalism can neither be the most mathematically optimum way we should collectively live. I suppose the question of an ideal nation raises another question: if we have failed to create a hypothetically and mathematically ideal society in the past, is humankind even capable of sustaining such a perfect system now? Does our failure in creating a utopia in the past mean the system in which we currently live is the best we can do?